From Brazil to California: Professionals take educational journey to gain U.S. career opportunities

The decision to jump on a corporate jet to interview in San Francisco at the headquarters of one of the fastest growing communications companies in California wasn’t an easy one.

Instead, it was part of an ongoing transformational journey that began in Curitiba, Brazil, where Amadeu dos Santos made the decision to learn U.S. business practices.

Amadeu dos Santos Junior

Amadeu dos Santos

“In Brazil, I worked for a fast-paced telecom company where things moved along so quickly, it was a great work experience and even though I was in a consistent position in my career I knew that something had to be done in order to continuously grow” said dos Santos.

Understanding the abrupt nature of business environments, he knew it would soon be necessary to learn about the U.S. business culture to gain global perspective and earn the potential to advance within the human resources profession.

Following a recent promotion to senior human resources manager at Global Village Telecom, GVT, dos Santos decided to take the steps to expand his business knowledge globally. He applied to the Business Programs for International Students at UC San Diego Extension, designed exclusively for international students.

Upon entering the professional certificate program in Business Management, he elected to specialize in Human Resource Management, a curriculum based on American HR business practices.

During enrollment in the HR program, dos Santos completed two courses that set him up with what would become his future employer, WiLine Networks.

As part of a course requirement, dos Santos was able to work as an intern on a project that allowed him to apply his newly acquired HR knowledge. Following a needs assessment, he developed a step-by-step process for the company to implement continuous training and onboarding programs to help reduce turnover and maximize human capital – something he values as one of the most important resources companies have.

“Before the program, I thought language was going to be the biggest learning barrier. But, the full-time program, interaction with teachers and peers gave me the correct tools to learn, improve myself and I began to understand the different American business mindset.

“I had to break past this obstacle on how to balance assertiveness – a universal challenge that is unique in every country. Once I learned this, I was able to improve my language to express ideas that made sense here,” said dos Santos.

Today, he works in Silicon Valley, California, where he lives with his wife and their newborn. Dos Santos is just one of the many program graduates hired on by U.S.-based companies seeking to gain international perspective.

Like Dos Santos, Bruna Elias is also from Brazil, and is just starting to climb the professional ladder. Elias said she realized early on that to stand out competitively, she would need to offer something more than English proficiencies.

Bruna Nogueira Profile

Bruna Elias

Elias had studied English in her native country since 2001. She first visited the United States to study the language in 2010 in Santa Barbara, and instantly fell in love with California. She returned to Brazil to attend ESPM in Porto Alegre to pursue a bachelor’s in International Relations, but Elias decided to return to the United States for further study so she could better understand American business. She applied to earn a certificate in Business Essentials, one of the four certificate programs offered at UC San Diego Extension’s Business Programs for International Students.

“I had no doubt about UC San Diego Extension and knew it would be a pleasure to study in one of the best universities in the world. I selected to enroll in the nine-month (four-quarter) program that allowed me to apply for one year of temporary employment, Optional Practical Training (OPT),” said Elias.

For Brazilians, Elias explained, the chance to work in the United States is a sought-after opportunity.

After graduating from the program in June 2016, Elias said she was impressed with the content and appreciated learning with people who came from all over the globe.

“This was a unique opportunity for me because I could understand that the same subject we learn in our country can be seen with different eyes – from one person to another. That is one of the most wonderful experiences we can have in life – to share our opinions and knowledge with others,” she said.

Elias will soon learn if she is approved for Optional Practical Training. She said she feels she is ready to share all that she has learned and hopes to continue to grow her knowledge by working with an American company.

“It is a huge experience to work with Americans and other nationalities. I am so thankful for UC San Diego Extension to have taught so many theories and also how to be more human,” she said.

To learn more about UC San Diego Extension’s Business Programs for International Students, visit extension.ucsd.edu/ip or contact Bobby at bpis@ucsd.edu.

UC San Diego Extension Business Programs for International Students offers four full-time certificate programs to help students with advanced English language proficiency increase their understanding of U.S. business practices. Certificate programs include Project Management, Business Essentials, Intermediate Business Essentials, and Business Management. Students can choose to further specialize in finance, marketing, human resources, and global commerce.

The making of a UC San Diego Extension certificate program (infographic)

There’s a point in every person’s career when they realize they want to changes jobs or move up the organizational ladder, but maybe they’re not quite sure how to make it happen. Should it involve going back to school full time? Will it require a degree? And how can it be done without having to spend (or go into debt for) tens of thousands of dollars?

Enter UC San Diego Extension’s certificate programs. Every program offers students an opportunity to examine a new field and demonstrate to others they have the discipline to work toward a specific goal while increasing their earning potential and marketability.

The completion of a certificate program provides:

  • Documentation of specific, formal study at a highly-regarded academic institution
  • Career-oriented, post-graduate training to complement a college or university degree
  • Well-developed job skills and knowledge for your current job, a promotion, or career change

Why a UC San Diego Extension Certificate?

A UC San Diego Extension certificate is a widely-respected academic credential certifying completion of a rigorous and specialized course of study that’s recognized and valued by employers. Designed by industry experts and academic faculty, our cutting-edge programs meet high academic standards and provide real-world skills.

Here’s how to we take an idea and develop it into a high-quality, high-value certificate program:

PNG-WI16-3036 Cert Creation Info Graphic.jpg

We offer two types of certificate programs: Professional and Specialized. Professional programs consist of a minimum of 20 units of approved continuing education credit (200 classroom instruction hours). Specialized programs consist of a minimum of 9 units of approved continuing education credit (90 classroom instruction hours).

Curious about what we have to offer? Take a look at our list of programs to see if there’s a one that’s right for you.

Four Steps to Earn Your Certificate

  1. Review the Certificate Course Matrix (i.e. class schedule) and apply for the certificate program of your choice (click the Apply Now button on the specific certificate page you are interested in). Make sure to fill it out completely!
  2. Receive your program approval via email and enroll in course(s) listed on the Certificate Course Matrix.
  3. Complete all required courses and your chosen electives with a grade of C- or better, within five years.
  4. Submit your Notice of Completion online, or by mail to the address specified above.

Have questions about our programs? Feel free to search our website or contact Student Services with your questions. We are happy to help you!

I’m looking for a job. What can UC San Diego Extension do for me?

iStock_000054380670_smaller“I just” — take your pick here — “a) graduated, b) got laid off, or c) decided to change careers and I’m done with taking classes.” I’ve heard this countless times as I’ve attended career fairs and community outreach events on behalf of UC San Diego Extension. “I’m here to find a job” is the refrain of the day.

Battle-weary after months of fruitless job searching, the San Diego job seekers who attend these fairs are more than ready to land those elusive jobs. Resumes in hand, professionally attired, confident smiles and firm handshakes ready to be deployed, they make the rounds at Recruiter Tables Row.

When they arrive at our table, they’re understandably stumped. “What is a major university’s continuing education division doing at a career fair? How can you help me get a job?” they wonder. I tell them that we’re the continuing education and public programs division of UC San Diego. That we’re here to help them with their professional goals. Or personal enrichment, for that matter. That we may not have actual job openings, but we can help them get a job.

Here’s how.

Become more hireable with real world know-how

Many recent college graduates find themselves in uncharted territory. The bioengineering degree that Brad Jensen is completing may not equip him with the nuts and bolts needed to hit the biotech ground running. Theoretical courses in college somehow don’t easily translate to practical applications, he finds out.

At UC San Diego, undergraduate students like Brad are able to register for an Extension professional program at no cost while they complete their college course work. The LAUNCH program allows them to supplement their bachelor’s degree with real-world knowledge taught by working professionals who practice what they teach and share their firsthand expertise.

When Brad graduates, he’ll also have a professional certificate in Biotechnology Project Management along with his diploma, which will boost his chances of getting hired.

Get a taste of what it’s really like with a “Next Step Experience”

Internships are, of course, a great way for both students and job seekers to gain hands-on, immersive experience. UC San Diego Extension offers an internship-like program through “Next Step Experience” courses. Practice over theory is emphasized — precisely why they are an essential component of many certificate programs, including Brewing, Fitness Instruction and Exercise Science, Business Management, and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counseling. It’s a practical capstone that nicely tops off a practical education.

Fertile ground for networking

Most of Extension’s 31,627 students have a college degree and are working professionals. For students, this means amplified networking advantages that can be cultivated into valuable professional connections. It’s a well-known fact that most jobs are not advertised (up to 80% according to Howard Poplinger, owner of human-resource company Epic Development and Evaluation), with employers increasingly bypassing online job boards and opting instead to hire directly through their employee networks. It’s all about “who you know.”

Realign your strengths, acquire needed knowledge

When asked about the nature of the jobs they seek, our job hunters respond confidently: positions in Human Resources, Digital Content Marketing, Information Technologies, or Teaching English to non-native speakers. Well and good. The only wrinkle is that, more often than not, their work experience and skills don’t reflect the right knowledge to land their dream jobs. Their expectations and actual experience are not aligned. And most of the time, they weren’t even aware of it.

Andy Harris may have had a successful retail sales career for 15 years but that won’t make the case for the HR job he wants now. Similarly, Marla Ramos may have worked as a web designer for five years until she got laid off. But that won’t seal the deal for the digital content editor position she’s pursuing. There may be some qualifications Andy and Marla can readily bring to the table, but those won’t be enough. Andy will need to learn about strategies for hiring and retaining talent, while Marla will need to hone effective writing skills to complement her design background to be in the running for the job she wants.

Proof!

Continuing education certificates and courses can bolster your strengths and help you acquire knowledge relevant to your new career. They’re tangible proof of what employers seek:

  • Commitment
  • Dexterity
  • Adaptability

And, yes — additional proof of your knowledge, the evidence employers want.

Access free career resources

At some point in your career — be it early, mid, transitional, or later stage — you may benefit from objective assessments of your strengths and weaknesses, along with professional guidance. UC San Diego Extension offers quarterly free clinics that can point you in the right direction so you can arrive at an optimal life/work balance. You may discover valuable, career-propelling insights that you may have missed on your own.

Move forward with lifelong learning

Innovation is a wonderful thing. But expect to continuously update your skills and knowledge to keep up with advancements and new technologies that will impact our global workplace. Expect to be nimble, to embrace new things. UC San Diego Extension’s goal is to be your lifelong learning resource and partner so you can continue on your path to career and personal growth.

Hopefully, you now have a better idea of how UC San Diego Extension can help. Next time you visit a career fair, you just may find that we have a table there. Please stop by and say hello. And let’s talk about the next steps that will lead you to that job. Or wherever you want to go.

Extension applauds UC San Diego’s new partnership with Baja’s UABC University

Universidad Autonoma de Baja California

Universidad Autonoma de Baja California

UC San Diego Extension welcomes the recent announcement that UC San Diego has entered into an initiative with the Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Mexico (UABC) to increase collaboration and exchange among students and faculty from both universities.

The five-year initiative was formalized by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla and UABC President Felipe Cuamea Velazquez.

As planned, UC San Diego’s collaboration with UABC will include any desirable and feasible activity to foster cooperation between both institutions. UABC has campuses in Tijuana, Ensenada, and Mexicali.

Such interaction may include: exchanges of faculty; exchanges of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars; joint research projects and publications; exchanges of publications, materials and information; and special short-term programs and visits.

“As the continuing education arm of the university, we are eager to find ways to be an active participant in this exciting bi-national partnership,” said Extension dean Mary Walshok. “The initiative can further broaden the growing outreach of our successful international programs.”

 

UC San Diego Extension’s international program to host Fulbright Gateway Orientation

For the first time, UC San Diego Extension will host a Fulbright Gateway Orientation for approximately 70 international students representing more than 40 countries, August 11-15, 2014, on behalf of the Fulbright Foreign Student Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE).

 

CROSS CULTURAL: Extension's International Programs students

CROSS CULTURAL: Extension’s International Programs students

The Fulbright Program organizes several Gateway Orientations each summer to introduce its newest students to U.S. culture and to American higher education expectations and norms.

“This represents the perfect opportunity for UC San Diego Extension and main campus to showcase our capacity to provide an excellent introduction to American culture and university life,” said Roxanne Nuhaily, assistant dean, UC San Diego Extension International Programs. “We’re proud to welcome these exceptionally bright students to our campus and our community.”

San Diego-based activities will include a bus tour of the region, opening and closing dinners, meeting with current Fulbright students living in San Diego, and meeting with various community members to learn about their careers and everyday lives.

The majority of visiting students will pursue master’s degrees and doctorates. Following the orientation program at UC San Diego, the students will fly to their destination universities in the U.S. to pursue degree programs or study projects.

Orientation topics will include cross-culture understanding and adjustment, U.S. politics and history, academic integrity, and interpersonal relationships.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the Fulbright program provides funding for students, scholars, teachers, and professionals to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching in elementary and secondary schools.

An independent, not-for-profit founded in 1919, the Institute of International Education is among the world’s largest and most experienced international education and training organizations.  Fulbright programs and the Fulbright Gateway Orientation are administered by the IIE, the Institute for International Education.

UC San Diego Extension’s International Program to host Fulbright Gateway Orientation

Students in UC San Diego Extension's International Program

“The perfect opportunity to showcase our capacity to provide an excellent introduction to American culture and university life.”

For the first time, UC San Diego Extension will host a Fulbright Gateway Orientation for approximately 70 international students representing more than 40 countries, August 11-15, 2014, on behalf of the Fulbright Foreign Student Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and administered by the Institute of International Education (IIE).

The Fulbright Program organizes several Gateway Orientations each summer to introduce its newest students to U.S. culture and to American higher education expectations and norms.

“This represents the perfect opportunity for UC San Diego Extension and main campus to showcase our capacity to provide an excellent introduction to American culture and university life,” said Roxanne Nuhaily, director of UC San Diego’s Extension International Programs. “We’re proud to welcome these exceptionally bright students to our campus and our community.”

San Diego-based activities will include a bus tour of the region, opening and closing dinners, meeting with current Fulbright students living in San Diego, and meeting with various community members to learn about their careers and everyday lives.

The majority of visiting students will pursue master’s degrees and doctorates. Following the orientation program at UC San Diego, the students will fly to their destination universities in the U.S. to pursue degree programs or study projects.

Orientation topics will include cross-culture understanding and adjustment, U.S. politics and history, academic integrity, and interpersonal relationships.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the Fulbright program provides funding for students, scholars, teachers, and professionals to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching in elementary and secondary schools.

An independent, not-for-profit founded in 1919, the Institute of International Education is among the world’s largest and most experienced international education and training organizations.  Fulbright programs and the Fulbright Gateway Orientation are administered by the IIE, the Institute for International Education.

Extension Dean to be featured speaker at educators conference

UC San Diego Extension Dean Mary Walshok will be among the featured speakers at the upcoming conference of the National Association of International Educators (NAFSA) on Wednesday, May 28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

NATL ASSOC OF INTL EDUCATORS

Dean Walshok, an innovator in global education programs, will address the topic of “How to Better Articulate the Community Benefits of International Education.”

UC San Diego’s English Language Institute (ELI) and International Programs (IP) offer study abroad programs for international students within UC San Diego Extension.

The NAFSA conference, held May 25-30, is expected to attract more than 8,500 member educators from around the U.S. and the world, with the theme of “Pathways to Global Competence.” (NAFSA was founded in 1948 as the National Association of Foreign Student Advisers)

“Having Dean Walshok as a featured speaker is a distinct honor for our programs,” said Roxanne Nuhaily, director of ELI and IP. “Plus, the conference promises to be a prime opportunity for us to re-connect with our current educational partners and reach out to prospective partners around the world.”

UC San Diego’s ELI and International Programs serve more than 3,000 international students each year.

Earlier this year, a leading Japanese publication, Ryugaku Journal, rated UC San Diego’s English Language Institute (ELI) as the nation’s No.1 U.S.-based school for Japanese students and No. 2 in the world.

The Tokyo-based publication aligned with Japan’s largest study-abroad program annually ranks the world’s top English language institutes. The ratings were based on a survey of Japanese students who have studied abroad.

Global CONNECT Report: ‘Frictionless border’ would benefit both sides

A comprehensive research report prepared by a coalition of nationally-respected urban economic experts, including UC San Diego Extension’s Global CONNECT, contends that both the United States and Mexico would benefit significantly from establishing what is termed a “frictionless border.”

5-1-14 BORDER BARRIERS, POWER POINTSuch a change in diplomatic and economic strategy would enable the San Diego-Tijuana border crossing to greatly accelerate bi-national economic growth and prosperity rather than serving as a choke-point of congestion.

Titled “From Border Barriers to Bi-National Promise: What the Future Could Be with a Frictionless Border,” the 25-page report was prepared with the Creative Class Group, a New York-based urban-studies consulting firm, in close partnership with Global CONNECT, a global research division of UC San Diego Extension. Nathan Owens serves as director of Global CONNECT.

“The key to fully maximizing the potential of the border will require us to integrate economic, social and cultural objectives into border policy, said Mary Walshok, associate vice chancellor of public programs, dean of UC San Diego Extension and a co-author on the report. “We regard the focus as reimagining the border and its management.”

In one of several media interviews, Dean Walshok discussed the report with U-TTV host Roger Hedgecock: http://www.utsandiego.com/video/play/69570/

Researchers met with dozens of business, community and government officials on both sides of the Tijuana-San Diego border to hear their personal stories and vision for a frictionless U.S. and Mexico border.

The report’s conclusion is that billions of dollars of economic opportunity are being squandered due to the narrow definition of the border as exclusively a homeland security issue, and that integrating economic and social-cultural objectives into border policy could unlock this huge potential.

On May 1, the report’s findings were presented to civic, business, academic and public policy experts representing both sides of the border. The meeting was hosted by the San Diego Foundation.

Each day, more than 300,000 daily commuters cross the San Diego-Tijuana border in each direction, many forced to endure wait times as long as two to three hours and more. Annually, more than 60 million border crossings are made, an estimated half for shopping and recreation, with 10 million job-related.

Health is global: ‘I’ve seen the poverty, I’ve felt the pain’

The depth of feeling Maria Lourdes Reyes brings to her job can’t be put into words. Sometimes, she cries.

“I have seen where some of these people are coming from,” said Reyes, a UC San Diego Extension instructor and pathologist. “I’ve seen the poverty, I’ve felt the pain.”

MARIA LOURDES REYES

Instructor Profile:
Maria Lourdes Reyes, Introduction to Public Health & Global Issues

Reyes is excited about turning her compassion into a new UCSD Extension course, “Introduction to Public Health and Global Issues,” slated to start Jan. 7, 2014.

“For me, it becomes very emotional when you see up-close that there’s so much need, right here in our backyard,” she said. “Sometimes, we don’t know where to begin. There’s so much to do, I feel like crying.”

Headquartered in San Diego, PCI provides medical expertise, disease-prevention aid and empowerment to 16 countries around the world, including clinics in San Diego. Reyes serves as PCI’s director of California programs.

“The world is borderless,” she said. “Health is global and people are people everywhere. We need to share what we know. I love to teach, I really do.”

A native of the Philippines who came to the U.S. as a medical resident, Reyes was formerly volunteer president of the American Cancer Society’s state-wide division. Her PCI office is based in National City, which remains one of the nation’s lowest-per capita cities.

Reyes prefers to see a brighter light: “What I do is joyful giving because I care so much.”

Translating experience into your own business

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment of interpreters and translators is expected to grow 42% in the United States by 2020. As globalization and worldwide trade become common place, translators are increasingly needed to assist in communication between cultures. Even though free programs like Google Translator are readily available,computers cannot compete with the delicacy of human translation that remains unparalleled by technology.

Daniel Salinero became a full time public school teacher in 1981, teaching English as a second language (ESL).Six years before that, Salinero began translating English-to-Spanish and Spanish-to-English part-time.

Daniel Salinero

After 36 years in the business, why would Salinero enroll in a continuing education translation program? The answer is twofold: On the one hand, he wanted to enhance a skill set he already had, and on the other, he wanted to create a more professional business around his freelance translation work, as the industry expends and becomes more competitive.

“I realized that I needed a better, more formal foundation upon which I could build,” Salinero says. “The catalyst was working on a project for a global surrogacy insurance company based in the Coachella Valley, where I live. It was very interesting work. I did a good job, but quickly realized that with more formal education, I could make better use of my time while translating, employ new strategies and techniques that I was not yet aware of, learn about online and print resources that would make my work easier and more enjoyable, and better understand translation software tools.”

Salinero realized he could become an even better translator with the guidance and framework of an established university program.

“I achieved all of that and more with the UCSD Extension Specialized Certificate in Translation Program,” Salinero says. “I’ve always enjoyed translation, languages, grammar, and vocabulary, and I realized that if I build my translation business during the summer, I can also eventually create a thriving translation business once I retire. I want it to supplement my pension, keep my mind active, and allow me to continue working at something that I truly enjoy.”

Salinero found the UCSD Extension program particularly attractive because he could complete the work from a distance, online. Asked to name three specific things he learned in the program that have helped him enhance his second career, he did not hesitate: “Learning the business side of translation, practicing the translation method taught in the program, and incredibly helpful critiques of my translations by experienced professors who have been professional translators.”

Salinero says his translation business has grown due to his website (www.TheWriteTranslator.com), and he has a business plan to guide his translation work, including concrete pricing and deadline parameters that help him create realistic, competitive quotes before he begins work on a piece.

Check out the Translation program and other courses offered by UC San Diego Extension.